Dyslexia, living with it.

Dyslexia comes in different forms, but we aren’t going to waste time touching on them all, or even the science behind them, we are merely going to talk about the effects on both the sufferer (poor terminology) and those that live with it.

For me Dyslexia is annoying in everyday life, such as jobs, blogs and status logs.  The mistakes make you feel a little stupid, even though you are not, and you always assume others think you are stupid when they read your written work.  Editing takes longer and spell checking is a job in itself.  You either take 3 times as long going over work, before others view it to save face, or you say “sod it” and just leave it down to the reader to look past your errors.

You might have a very valid inspirational thought, great joke or short story but by the time people have figured out exactly what you are trying to say the wow factor has gone and impact lost.  You might have given an essay your all and then hand in your your work feeling quite proud and empowered only to get it back feeling less capable because the tutor marks you down because your dyslexia was overlooked.

Other problems you encounter are a loss of interest in book work or reading, this then leaves you with less information than your peers who could read the book, or at least they couldcread it much quicker than you.  In some cases my peers may have finished a chapter before I finished one or two pages, felt mentally exhausted and still wasn’t following what was being taught or told.

Processing the spoken word was usually much easier and I found an almost photographic ability to remember conversations word for word, but put it in writting and I could be lost as the openning paragraph.  Mixing up letters is another part of Dyslexia that is so irritating, especially when you proof read your work lots of times and eventually spot your own mistakes.

It gets annoying for those living with you sometimes as well, as they try to understand something you’ve written or it’s the hundredth time you shout out “how do you spell…….?”  When parents have to be more patient with their Dyslexic children while doing homework or that sinking feeling a parent sees their child have when they get work wrong, the extra time and effort given to the Dyslexic child on any written work. Often Dyslexia isn’t spotted and stupidity or laziness become the obvious reason for errors, slowly produced work or even the lack of interest.

It’s also hard for a loved one that doesn’t suffer with Dyslexia themselves to feel embarressed by the results of a Dyslexia relative in public, with that repetative feeling that comes with it “I hope they don’t think Dad is stupid, this is so embarressing.”

Sometimes you might apologise (as if you need to) before mistakes are seen, or that perhaps you should wear a badge to avoid the constant need to explain yourself.

Many years ago these learning difficulties (using the term lightly) were not known about, now Dyslexia is known about but often missed in either a class or work setting.  Perhaps in the future Dyslexia will hardly be missed at all, perhaps even supported correctly.

I mentioned that I used the term “learning difficulties” lightly because it isn’t an issue of being unable to learn but the inability to learn a specific way, if you can find the correct way of teaching someone with Dyslexia then they will learn just like anyone else, so you might call it a teaching difficulty? If it’s a teaching difficulty then that lies with the teacher or school not the individual, seeing as it is the responsibility of the education facility to teach each student and not just overlook or excuse them.

In short, every human being has weaknesses, some more than other, some in different ways and some to different levels which is why we are all truely interdependant not independant.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s